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Biotechnology Frontier (Yearly) is an international comprehensive professional academic journal of Ivy Publisher, concerning the development of biotechnology technology. The main focus of the journal is the academic papers, comments and research review of latest improvement in the fields of Biotechnology technology, microorganism, medicine, agriculture & forestry, edible fungus, light food, environmental protection and related, aiming at... [More] Biotechnology Frontier (Yearly) is an international comprehensive professional academic journal of Ivy Publisher, concerning the development of biotechnology technology. The main focus of the journal is the academic papers, comments and research review of latest improvement in the fields of Biotechnology technology, microorganism, medicine, agriculture & forestry, edible fungus, light food, environmental protection and related, aiming at providing a good communication platform to transfer, share and discuss the theoretical and technical development of electrical theory development for professionals, scholars, researchers and administrative staffs in this field, reflecting the academic front level, promote academic change and foster the development of biotechnology technology.

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Paper Infomation

Natural Selection on Human Mitochondrial DNA

Full Text(PDF, 792KB)

Author: Siqi Huang, Chuanchao Wang, Hui Li

Abstract: As an important tool for population genetics and molecular anthropology, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has long been used for the studies of human origin and evolution. However, previous studies were mostly based on simple models of evolution, ignoring the possible effects of natural selection upon mtDNA. In recent years, human mitochondrial genome was proved having undergone strong effect of natural selection by an increasing number of evidences. Climate-induced adaptive selection has contributed to shaping the current continent-specific distribution of mtDNA lineages. Strong purifying selection has also been suggested by statistics of nonsynonymous versus synonymous mutations on mtDNA. Therefore, possible effects induced by natural selection should be taken into account when we use mtDNA in human population genetic studies.

Keywords: Mitochondrial DNA; Purifying Selection; Adaptive Selection; Synonymous Mutation; Climate; Evolution

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